An example of a normal but not Lindelof Cp(X)

In this post, we discuss an example of a function space C_p(X) that is normal and not Lindelof (as indicated in the title). Interestingly, much more can be said about this function space. In this post, we show that there exists a space X such that

  • C_p(X) is collectionwise normal and not paracompact,
  • C_p(X) is not Lindelof but contains a dense Lindelof subspace,
  • C_p(X) is not first countable but is a Frechet space,
  • As a corollary of the previous point, C_p(X) cannot contain a copy of the compact space \omega_1+1,
  • C_p(X) is homeomorphic to C_p(X)^\omega,
  • C_p(X) is not hereditarily normal,
  • C_p(X) is not metacompact.

A short and quick description of the space X is that X is the one-point Lindelofication of an uncountable discrete space. As shown below, the function space C_p(X) is intimately related to a \Sigma-product of copies of real lines. The results listed above are merely an introduction to this wonderful example and are derived by examining the \Sigma-products of copies of real lines. Deep results about \Sigma-product of real lines abound in the literature. The references listed at the end are a small sample. Example 3.2 in [2] is another interesting illustration of this example.

We now define the domain space X=L_\tau. In the discussion that follows, the Greek letter \tau is always an uncountable cardinal number. Let D_\tau be a set with cardinality \tau. Let p be a point not in D_\tau. Let L_\tau=D_\tau \cup \left\{p \right\}. Consider the following topology on L_\tau:

  • Each point in D_\tau an isolated point, and
  • open neighborhoods at the point p are of the form L_\tau-K where K \subset D_\tau is countable.

It is clear that L_\tau is a Lindelof space. The Lindelof space L_\tau is sometimes called the one-point Lindelofication of the discrete space D_\tau since it is a Lindelof space that is obtained by adding one point to a discrete space.

Consider the function space C_p(L_\tau). See this post for general information on the pointwise convergence topology of C_p(Y) for any completely regular space Y.

All the facts about C_p(X)=C_p(L_\tau) mentioned at the beginning follow from the fact that C_p(L_\tau) is homeomorphic to the \Sigma-product of \tau many copies of the real lines. Specifically, C_p(L_\tau) is homeomorphic to the following subspace of the product space \mathbb{R}^\tau.

    \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R}=\left\{ x \in \mathbb{R}^\tau: x_\alpha \ne 0 \text{ for at most countably many } \alpha<\tau \right\}

Thus understanding the function space C_p(L_\tau) is a matter of understanding a \Sigma-product of copies of the real lines. First, we establish the homeomorphism and then discuss the properties of C_p(L_\tau) indicated above.

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The Homeomorphism

For each f \in C_p(L_\tau), it is easily seen that there is a countable set C \subset D_\tau such that f(p)=f(y) for all y \in D_\tau-C. Let W_0=\left\{f \in C_p(L_\tau): f(p)=0 \right\}. Then each f \in W_0 has non-zero values only on a countable subset of D_\tau. Naturally, W_0 and \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} are homeomorphic.

We claim that C_p(L_\tau) is homeomorphic to W_0 \times \mathbb{R}. For each f \in C_p(L_\tau), define h(f)=(f-f(p),f(p)). Here, f-f(p) is the function g \in C_p(L_\tau) such that g(x)=f(x)-f(p) for all x \in L_\tau. Clearly h(f) is well-defined and h(f) \in W_0 \times \mathbb{R}. It can be readily verified that h is a one-to-one map from C_p(L_\tau) onto W_0 \times \mathbb{R}. It is not difficult to verify that both h and h^{-1} are continuous.

We use the notation X_1 \cong X_2 to mean that the spaces X_1 and X_2 are homeomorphic. Then we have:

    C_p(L_\tau) \ \cong \ W_0 \times \mathbb{R} \ \cong \ (\Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R})  \times \mathbb{R} \ \cong \ \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R}

Thus C_p(L_\tau) \ \cong \ \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R}. This completes the proof that C_p(L_\tau) is topologically the \Sigma-product of \tau many copies of the real lines.

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Looking at the \Sigma-Product

Understanding the function space C_p(L_\tau) is now reduced to the problem of understanding a \Sigma-product of copies of the real lines. Most of the facts about \Sigma-products that we need have already been proved in previous blog posts.

In this previous post, it is established that the \Sigma-product of separable metric spaces is collectionwise normal. Thus C_p(L_\tau) is collectionwise normal. The \Sigma-product of spaces, each of which has at least two points, always contains a closed copy of \omega_1 with the ordered topology (see the lemma in this previous post). Thus C_p(L_\tau) contains a closed copy of \omega_1 and hence can never be paracompact (and thus not Lindelof).

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Consider the following subspace of the \Sigma-product \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R}:

    \sigma_\tau=\left\{ x \in \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R}: x_\alpha \ne 0 \text{ for at most finitely many } \alpha<\tau \right\}

In this previous post, it is shown that \sigma_\tau is a Lindelof space. Though C_p(L_\tau) \cong \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} is not Lindelof, it has a dense Lindelof subspace, namely \sigma_\tau.

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A space Y is first countable if there exists a countable local base at each point y \in Y. A space Y is a Frechet space (or is Frechet-Urysohn) if for each y \in Y, if y \in \overline{A} where A \subset Y, then there exists a sequence \left\{y_n: n=1,2,3,\cdots \right\} of points of A such that the sequence converges to y. Clearly, any first countable space is a Frechet space. The converse is not true (see Example 1 in this previous post).

For any uncountable cardinal number \tau, the product \mathbb{R}^\tau is not first countable. In fact, any dense subspace of \mathbb{R}^\tau is not first countable. In particular, the \Sigma-product \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} is not first countable. In this previous post, it is shown that the \Sigma-product of first countable spaces is a Frechet space. Thus C_p(L_\tau) \cong \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} is a Frechet space.

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As a corollary of the previous point, C_p(L_\tau) \cong \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} cannot contain a homeomorphic copy of any space that is not Frechet. In particular, it cannot contain a copy of any compact space that is not Frechet. For example, the compact space \omega_1+1 is not embeddable in C_p(L_\tau). The interest in compact subspaces of C_p(L_\tau) \cong \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} is that any compact space that is topologically embeddable in a \Sigma-product of real lines is said to be Corson compact. Thus any Corson compact space is a Frechet space.

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It can be readily verified that

    \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} \ \cong \ \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} \ \times \ \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} \ \times \ \Sigma_{\alpha<\tau}\mathbb{R} \ \times \ \cdots \ \text{(countably many times)}

Thus C_p(L_\tau) \cong C_p(L_\tau)^\omega. In particular, C_p(L_\tau) \cong C_p(L_\tau) \times C_p(L_\tau) due to the following observation:

    C_p(L_\tau) \times C_p(L_\tau) \cong C_p(L_\tau)^\omega \times C_p(L_\tau)^\omega \cong C_p(L_\tau)^\omega \cong C_p(L_\tau)

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As a result of the peculiar fact that C_p(L_\tau) \cong C_p(L_\tau) \times C_p(L_\tau), it can be concluded that C_p(L_\tau), though normal, is not hereditarily normal. This follows from an application of Katetov’s theorem. The theorem states that if Y_1 \times Y_2 is hereditarily normal, then either Y_1 is perfectly normal or every countably infinite subset of Y_2 is closed and discrete (see this previous post). The function space C_p(L _\tau) is not perfectly normal since it contains a closed copy of \omega_1. On the other hand, there are plenty of countably infinite subsets of C_p(L _\tau) that are not closed and discrete. As a Frechet space, C_p(L _\tau) has many convergent sequences. Each such sequence without the limit is a countably infinite set that is not closed and discrete. As an example, let \left\{x_1,x_2,x_3,\cdots \right\} be an infinite subset of D_\tau and consider the following:

    C=\left\{f_n: n=1,2,3,\cdots \right\}

where f_n is such that f_n(x_n)=n and f_n(x)=0 for each x \in L_\tau with x \ne x_n. Note that C is not closed and not discrete since the points in C converge to g \in \overline{C} where g is the zero-function. Thus C_p(L_\tau) \cong C_p(L_\tau) \times C_p(L_\tau) is not hereditarily normal.

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It is well known that collectionwise normal metacompact space is paracompact (see Theorem 5.3.3 in [4] where metacompact is referred to as weakly paracompact). Since C_p(L_\tau) is collectionwise normal and not paracompact, C_p(L_\tau) can never be metacompact.

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Reference

  1. Arkhangelskii, A. V., Topological Function Spaces, Mathematics and Its Applications Series, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 1992.
  2. Bella, A., Masami, S., Tight points of Pixley-Roy hyperspaces, Topology Appl., 160, 2061-2068, 2013.
  3. Corson, H. H., Normality in subsets of product spaces, Amer. J. Math., 81, 785-796, 1959.
  4. Engelking, R., General Topology, Revised and Completed edition, Heldermann Verlag, Berlin, 1989.

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\copyright \ 2014 \text{ by Dan Ma}

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